Episode 029

This is officially the last episode of The Voicemail for the year 2012. What do James and Stefan talk about? The failure of NFC, an iPhone case that comes with an e-ink screen, and Google turning off Exchange support in Gmail. The two also tackle listener questions about the worst smartphone ever invented, the 4G LTE situation in the UK, and the declining significance of Europe with respect to the mobile industry.

As always, we appreciate feedback. And if you use iTunes to listen to the show, then please do rate us! It helps new people find the podcast.

[Episode 029, 34 minutes 15 seconds, 31.3 MB]

Advertisements
Episode 029

8 thoughts on “Episode 029

  1. James, the you didn’t like the Windows 8 NFC tool is because it was just a tech demo, it didn’t do like the Samsung mouse pad and actually reach into relevant usage of the tech. NFC shouldn’t need to be seen, it should just work. Stefan’s point about control is a great one. What Japan made work is where is falling elsewhere else.

    Same thing about flexible screens. What’s the use case that makes sense here that doesn’t include breaking your phone? And 5.5 in isn’t small. Not pocket small.

    Windows phone folks can get Google email via IMAP/POP, folks will be fine. Basically do it as a manual connection; it’s not push, it is pull only. It’s simple. Calendar/contacts, they will not be fine. Oh well. It’s of those cases where open standards win.

    Smartphone for enemy: Palm Pixi or any Windows Mobile 6.5 device

    Psst… 4G means nothing until voice over LTE is the norm, and SMS/MMS is done over the same connections. It’s all data IP till then. And lots of battery inefficiency till LTE-A.

    Lots of the “no one cares” meme. Do you two think you are getting tired of what’s not happening, and what’s happening of so small steps? Feels a bit like that in James’ blog post. But overall that just seems like the case with you and others.

    Enjoy the trip Stefan; mercy Christmas to you both.

      1. When you spoke of the most pad, you pointed to how NFC, when paired with a specific context, worked and worked well. With the Windows NFC item, the tech could more than instigate you to another behavior, it as like a demo: enough to get you excited about the possibility, but not enough to actually do something relevant.

      2. bah…Swype… rewrite…

        When you spoke of the mouse pad, you pointed to how NFC, when paired with a specific context, worked and worked well. With the Windows NFC item, the tech could do no more than instigate you to another behavior. It was essentially a demo: enough to get you excited about the possibility, but not enough to actually do something relevant.

      3. My issue is, and perhaps I didn’t make it clear on the podcast, that WP8 doesn’t actually allow NFC tags to make changes to the device due to ‘security’. Whereas Android does.

      4. Windows not letting NFC make changes to the device means (to me) that it’s presence can’t be more than a tech demo. If the tech isn’t transformative, then it’s limiting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s